BONE ALMANAC

Philip’s First solo album since 2004. 14 bare-bones acoustic songs recorded with Justin Pizzoferrato.
Available on all formats (digital, CD, vinyl) November 8, 2019.

GRANT-LEE PHILLIPS ON ‘BONE ALMANAC’:

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“With Bone Almanac, Philip. B Price presents a fearless confrontation. Ever one to shun the glare, finding greater delights in the shadows I suspect, or in the harmonious swirl of Winterpills, the band he’s led for some fifteen years, Philip has created an album of striking intensity. Fourteen songs that voice a dire concern for the planet, a longing for action, a vow to find beauty and surmount despair. All of this, heightened by the recent birth of his son. 

”Art has a way of underscoring the oneness in things, bringing the invisible forth. Philip has done so with the precision and maturity of an artist who has spent a life observing, rendering his findings and questions in songs, poetry and images. 

“Here, he can be heard performing on the entirety of instruments, summoned to complement his pure impassioned voice and deft guitar work. Engineer Justin Pizzoferrato (Pixies, Sebadoh, Kim Gordon) has dutifully captured the haunting essence of Philip’s music, placing a premium on performance in the studio environment. Layered in just the right doses, each track is built upon the armature of Philip’s voice and guitar, the inherit presence and interplay of these warm colors. On this limestone foundation, Philip has built a sonic world. The effect is dynamic – from the whispered to the glorious. 

”The album opens with “Holding Onto Light”, a modal invocation that contemplates the ephemeral, as its shimmer of voices and guitars build to a stunning fury. Such questioning permeates Bone Almanac, as does hope. “C’mon World” is an exuberant petition to humankind with a splash of Philip’s self-effacing wit. The turbulent waltz of “Ropes” is a marriage of forces, both light and dark, with Philip arriving at the mantra, “The Ropes are on fire.” Visions of a more verdant future are expressed on the meditative “Smothered in Green.”

“Bone Almanac is bold in its vulnerability, urgent in its central plea. It’s an album that, like a fire in winter, will see you through the cold moonless nights, as you scry into its flickering light, eyeing the dance of shadows. It bears a hallmark that one can trace throughout Philip’s work, a gift for expressing a complexity of emotions with distinct melodic prowess. This is an album that operates on a deep level, to be experienced and felt in the heart and in the bones.”